The Official Blog of the Allen Memorial Art Museum

Apr 17

[video]

Apr 15

“Voice Amplified/Voice Interrupted: The Use of Punctuation Signs in Soviet Posters” - Art Historian Masha Kowell of the Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena, California, traces the syntactic, semantic, and graphic evolution of punctuation signs deployed in Soviet propaganda posters. She links their usage to shifts in Soviet censorship and artists’ resistance or complicity with it. The talk will take place this Thursday in Classroom 1 of the Allen Art Building. This lecture is co-sponsored by the Russian Department and the Clowes Lecture Fund, and the departments of History and Sociology.

“Voice Amplified/Voice Interrupted: The Use of Punctuation Signs in Soviet Posters” - Art Historian Masha Kowell of the Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena, California, traces the syntactic, semantic, and graphic evolution of punctuation signs deployed in Soviet propaganda posters. She links their usage to shifts in Soviet censorship and artists’ resistance or complicity with it.

The talk will take place this Thursday in Classroom 1 of the Allen Art Building.

This lecture is co-sponsored by the Russian Department and the Clowes Lecture Fund, and the departments of History and Sociology.

Apr 12

Now On View: Sometimes referred to as creators of outsider, folk, or vernacular art, self-taught artists are individuals who have not received formal artistic training. Many come from marginalized backgrounds, due to a variety of issues such as lack of educational or economic resources, social isolation, or even problems of mental health. The work of self-taught artists is often noted for its unique vision or idiosyncratic aesthetic, and for its divergence from Western art-historical traditions. Although most self-taught artists remain outside of the mainstream art world, the works of some figures, such as Raymond Pettibon and Henry Darger, have achieved enormous popularity and recognition in the contemporary art market.
Raymond Pettibon came to art by way of the Los Angeles punk rock scene, first designing album covers and posters for his band Black Flag. He later became known in the contemporary art world for his comic-style compositions, which provide ambiguous or ironic commentary on diverse aspects of American culture.This work is displayed in the exhibition “Modern and Contemporary Realisms" through June 22, 2014.Image:Raymond Pettibon (American, b. 1957)At Least I Got To See Vegas, 1989SilkscreenArt Rental Collection Fund, RC1994.15

Now On View: Sometimes referred to as creators of outsider, folk, or vernacular art, self-taught artists are individuals who have not received formal artistic training. Many come from marginalized backgrounds, due to a variety of issues such as lack of educational or economic resources, social isolation, or even problems of mental health. The work of self-taught artists is often noted for its unique vision or idiosyncratic aesthetic, and for its divergence from Western art-historical traditions. Although most self-taught artists remain outside of the mainstream art world, the works of some figures, such as Raymond Pettibon and Henry Darger, have achieved enormous popularity and recognition in the contemporary art market.

Raymond Pettibon came to art by way of the Los Angeles punk rock scene, first designing album covers and posters for his band Black Flag. He later became known in the contemporary art world for his comic-style compositions, which provide ambiguous or ironic commentary on diverse aspects of American culture.

This work is displayed in the exhibition “Modern and Contemporary Realisms" through June 22, 2014.

Image:
Raymond Pettibon (American, b. 1957)
At Least I Got To See Vegas, 1989
Silkscreen
Art Rental Collection Fund, RC1994.15

Apr 10

[video]

Apr 08

Please join us this Wednesday, April 9 for a special talk by James Zemaitis (OC ‘90). "Adventures in Modernism: One Obie’s Journey in the New York Design World" will take place starting at 4:30pm in Classroom 1 of the Allen Art Building.
He once sold a sofa for $250,000. Furniture aficionado James Zemaitis has propelled the market for modern fine art in senior positions at Sotheby’s, Phillips, and Christie’s. Currently a curatorial consultant for the Indianapolis Museum of Art and pursuing study at Bard Graduate Center, Zemaitis earned his bachelor’s degree in art history at Oberlin College. 
Image:Venturi-Scott Brown (designer), Knoll International (maker)Chippendale Chair with Grandmother Pattern, 1984Laminated plywoodCollection Victoria and Albert Museum (London)Given by the manufacturer, W.21-1990
Designed by Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown (who were also the architects for the AMAM’s 1977 wing), this chair of decorated, cut-out plywood has been celebrated for reintroducing historic form into contemporary furniture. Its name refers to the famous 18th century British furniture designer Thomas Chippendale.

Please join us this Wednesday, April 9 for a special talk by James Zemaitis (OC ‘90). "Adventures in Modernism: One Obie’s Journey in the New York Design World" will take place starting at 4:30pm in Classroom 1 of the Allen Art Building.

He once sold a sofa for $250,000. Furniture aficionado James Zemaitis has propelled the market for modern fine art in senior positions at Sotheby’s, Phillips, and Christie’s. Currently a curatorial consultant for the Indianapolis Museum of Art and pursuing study at Bard Graduate Center, Zemaitis earned his bachelor’s degree in art history at Oberlin College. 

Image:
Venturi-Scott Brown (designer), Knoll International (maker)
Chippendale Chair with Grandmother Pattern, 1984
Laminated plywood
Collection Victoria and Albert Museum (London)
Given by the manufacturer, W.21-1990

Designed by Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown (who were also the architects for the AMAM’s 1977 wing), this chair of decorated, cut-out plywood has been celebrated for reintroducing historic form into contemporary furniture. Its name refers to the famous 18th century British furniture designer Thomas Chippendale.

Apr 03

[video]

Mar 31

AMAM April First Thursday - this week! We hope you can join us for this special talk by Fred (OC ‘74) and Laura Bidwell, as they discuss the creation of the Transformer Station and their passion for collecting art. The talk will be followed by a reception in the East Gallery, with catering by Aladdin’s. Galleries open until 8pm, lecture begins at 5:30pm. 

AMAM April First Thursday - this week! We hope you can join us for this special talk by Fred (OC ‘74) and Laura Bidwell, as they discuss the creation of the Transformer Station and their passion for collecting art. The talk will be followed by a reception in the East Gallery, with catering by Aladdin’s. Galleries open until 8pm, lecture begins at 5:30pm. 

Mar 28

All this week on the AMAM Tumblr, we’ll be clearing out our queue of reblogs. Each day we will (finally!) re-blog a post that caught our eye or made us think over the past few months.Did you know that the WPA sponsored art classes? A great image very similar to what you might see in many art classes and museum education centers today!archivesofamericanart:

True story: the WPA wasn’t just about building bridges and commissioning murals - they also sponsored art classes in the 30’s, such as this sculpture class attended by 4-year-old William at the Brooklyn Children’s Museum.
A young boy named William at one of the Federal Art Project’s sculpture classes at the Brooklyn Children’s Museum, 1939 Mar. 9 / Andrew Herman, photographer. Federal Art Project, Photographic Division collection, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

All this week on the AMAM Tumblr, we’ll be clearing out our queue of reblogs. Each day we will (finally!) re-blog a post that caught our eye or made us think over the past few months.

Did you know that the WPA sponsored art classes? A great image very similar to what you might see in many art classes and museum education centers today!


archivesofamericanart
:

True story: the WPA wasn’t just about building bridges and commissioning murals - they also sponsored art classes in the 30’s, such as this sculpture class attended by 4-year-old William at the Brooklyn Children’s Museum.

A young boy named William at one of the Federal Art Project’s sculpture classes at the Brooklyn Children’s Museum, 1939 Mar. 9 / Andrew Herman, photographer. Federal Art Project, Photographic Division collection, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Mar 27

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Mar 26

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